Welcome to our new Cape Director

Last month, the SAJBD – Cape Council appointed Joshua Hovsha as its new executive director. Joshua has very much hit the ground running, and we have already had the opportunity of working with him on issues of national concern. I wish him all success in his new position, while knowing that he has an excellent team of lay leaders and professionals to back him up. 

The Cape Council can look back on another successful year, despite having to deal with various complex challenges.  The latter included having to address the sensitive question of women singing solo at Yom Hashoah, and here, thankfully, it was possible to come to a mutually acceptable solution for all those concerned. As in previous years, the Council continued to be active in the interfaith arena and broader social outreach, was much involved in making this year's commemoration of 175 years of Jewish life in South Africa such a success and in general played a key role in fostering unity and cooperation within the Cape Town Jewish community. Kudos to all those concerned, and especially to Cape Council chairman Eric Marx for his dedicated and hands-on leadership.

Recent Articles

Above Board 16.8.19

Welcome to our American visitors

We had hardly had a chance to (metaphorically) catch our breath after the whirlwind visit of our Women Wage Peace guests from Israel when it was time for us to welcome another prestigious delegation to South Africa, this time from the American Jewish Committee (AJC). One of the world’s most effective Jewish advocacy organisations, the AJC has a long and proud history of building relationships with different religious and ethnic communities and world leaders.

Women can bring peace to Middle East conflict

To create lasting peace, women’s voices are critical. Men alone won’t bring about peace and it’s about time that we all realise that. This is not just opinion - it’s in the numbers. From conflict prevention and conflict resolution to post-conflict reconciliation, studies have borne out that women’s meaningful participation in peace processes significantly increases the likelihood of a negotiated settlement lasting longer than 15 years.