Women's Day 2018

As we prepare to celebrate Women’s Day tomorrow, the SAJBD urges all South Africans to do more to combat the scourge of violence against women in our society.  There is a critical need for greater awareness, education and the enforcement of the law around gender-based violence, as well as discrimination in the workplace and in other spheres of daily life.  Our young girls should also be empowered through education, skills and development.

Combating gender-based violence and inequality is not the job of government and civil society alone. Each and every individual must to whatever he or she can in their own private spheres to respect, protect and support women in our country. 

At the same time, let us not forget that Women’s Day is also an opportunity to celebrate the contribution of women to South Africa excellence in the fields from science and medicine to politics and the arts. 

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The SAJBD was heartened by an email we received from Mr Solly Hattia, a member of the Muslim community.

“My experiences living amongst a Jewish community.  My first engagement with Jewish people began when the company I worked for merged with a Jewish family-owned-business and to whom I was then to report to as my new CEO.  My first encounter with my new Boss, Ronnie Norwitz, was on a Friday when he came down to my office at around 12 looked at his watch and said “Solly aren't you going to be late for your Friday prayer?”  Never before in all my years of working, had I ever had this courtesy from a boss!  His other interesting comment on my return from the Mosque was all ways, "Friday's are good days ".  Ronnie would always say this with the gesture of a clenched fist swinging his arm through the air as if he was going to hit someone.  He always greeted me with a smile and a kind word.  Braai days at work you would find him at my fire naturally. 

THE REAL PROBLEM WITH IQBAL JASSAT’S LATEST SCREED

At the biennial conference of the SA Jewish Board of Deputies Gauteng Council next week, Gauteng Jewry will have the first opportunity of engaging directly with President Ramaphosa since his assumption of the presidency earlier this year. Rather than delivering the traditional keynote address, Mr Ramaphosa will be exchanging views with eminent business leader Stephen Koseff on challenges currently facing South Africa, what the Jewish community is (or could be) doing to help address them and how each sees the future of the country and its people. In other words, it is not about what this country should be doing to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian, or any other foreign policy issue, but is framed as being a South African conversation between fellow South Africans on South African issues.